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The National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center in Baker City is reopening after three years of closure for renovations

BAKER CITY, Ore. (KTVZ) – Pioneers of all ages and backgrounds are invited to celebrate the reopening of the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center on Friday in Baker City. After a three-year closure for renovation work, the center will reopen to the public on Friday at 1 p.m. and is free to enter until Sunday.

Starting Saturday, summer hours will be 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, including public holidays. Admission is €8 for 16 years and older and €6 for seniors. The center also accepts passes to America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands.

Since opening in 1992, the center has attracted an estimated 2.5 million visitors to the area. To maintain some services during the closure, the BLM partnered with Baker County to install and staff an Oregon Trail exhibit at the Baker Heritage Museum, and with the City of Baker City to launch a new event: Oregon Trail Days at Geiser-Pollman Park – taking place June 7-8 this year.

“It was very important to us to continue to provide visitors with Oregon Trail experiences during the renovation,” said BLM Vale District Manager Shane DeForest, whose office oversees the center. “Additionally, this partnership has strengthened our bond with the museum and community, and we look forward to working together further.”

The renovation, which includes $1 million from the Great American Outdoors Act, is a best-in-class example of a net-zero emissions building: it is all-electric and meets the Biden-Harris Federal Building Performance Standard Administration by eliminating the use of fossil fuels on site, and it is highly efficient, as the facility’s energy consumption has been reduced by 73 percent thanks to new windows, doors, siding, insulation, roofing and heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems .

The Biden-Harris Administration is leading by example in addressing the climate crisis through President Biden’s Federal Sustainability Plan, which sets an ambitious path to achieve net-zero emissions from federal buildings by 2045.

“President Biden has set bold goals for federal sustainability, and this project will help us achieve those goals,” said Andrew Mayock, Federal Chief Sustainability Officer at the White House Council on Environmental Quality. “Upgrading our federal buildings to be more efficient and sustainable also means healthier communities.”

For more information about the center, visit www.oregontrail.blm.gov or call 541-523-1843.